And Josh should know. He claims he can text with one hand and rarely has to look down at the keyboard. "I do it so often you get pretty good at it,' he said.

Alyssa Berginski is also a regular texter, saying she sends 20 messages an hour, on average."/>
And Josh should know. He claims he can text with one hand and rarely has to look down at the keyboard. "I do it so often you get pretty good at it,' he said.

Alyssa Berginski is also a regular texter, saying she sends 20 messages an hour, on average."/> Texting vs. calling | News, Sports, Jobs - The Pierce County Tribune
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Texting vs. calling

By Staff | Jan 14, 2010

For what it’s worth, or should that be fwiw, texting has become the method of communication for teens and young adults, far surpassing cell phones.

“I’d say about 80 or 90 percent of high school students text,’ said Rugby senior Josh Houim. “It’s quicker and easier than calling.”

And Josh should know. He claims he can text with one hand and rarely has to look down at the keyboard. “I do it so often you get pretty good at it,’ he said.

Alyssa Berginski is also a regular texter, saying she sends 20 messages an hour, on average.

She admits a lot of the messages sent back and forth between friends are trivial in nature, but there is an upside to it.

“It’s quick and you get right to the point,’ she said. “And you don’t have the noise of a cell phone. You can text anywhere and not cause a disturbance.”

Taylor Harmel said he is more likely to answer a text message than a cell phone.

There are literally hundreds of phrases, words and even expressions that can be abbreviated on the screen, allowing extensive messages to be sent and received in little time.

Students at Rugby admit they text everywhere – at home, at work, at school, and yes, even in their vehicles.

Texting is not just for youngsters. Many adults text and more and more parents are picking up on it as a way to stay in touch with their teens.

“My mom doesn’t like it, but my dad wants to learn, Alyssa added.

Seniors Chris Fedje and Jacob Nelson are in the minority when it comes to texting. They don’t text, but not because they don’t like it, but because they don’t have texting capability on their current cell phone.

“If I had it, I would,’ Chris said. “I’ll get it with my next phone.”

The students agree that texting is likely here to stay as a form of instant communication and cell phone plans with text messaging are popular with teens.

“There are plans out there that are pretty reasonable,’ Harmel said.

And for text junkies, that’s 1daful.

-Staff report

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