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SECOND AMENDMENT ALIVE AND WELL IN NORTH DAKOTA

By Staff | Nov 6, 2015

“I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery.”– Thomas Jefferson. Being disarmed in a face of tyrannical government is a mistake that you only get to make once.

In today’s changing world many more people are looking to not just buy a firearm for personal protection, but to carry them on their person as they go about their daily routine. The citizens of North Dakota are no different with a record number of North Dakota residents exercising their right to bear arms by packing a firearm where the are legally allowed to go, leading to a self-protecting population that has more than doubled in less than four years according to a recent A.P. report.

North Dakota protects that right under Section 1 of the state constitution. There are two different types of concealed weapons license: a Class 1 license and a Class 2 license. The only difference between a Class 1 license and a Class 2 license is reciprocity. The licenses are each equally valid within the state of North Dakota, but because a Class 1 Licensee is required to take and pass (70%) a firearm proficiency test (shooting test) and a Class 2 licensee does not have to take that test, the holders of a Class 1 license have reciprocity in many more states than those who have a Class 2 license.

Holding a Concealed Weapon License does not mean that everyone may carry a gun, or that you may always carry a gun wherever you like. While you may openly carry an unloaded weapon without a permit during the day, or at any time on your own land or fixed place of business, North Dakota requires a concealed carry permit to carry a loaded weapon concealed on (or near) your body or vehicle at any other place during the day or night. In addition according to Sheriff Siegler and Chief Rose you wouldn’t need any type of concealed weapon permit to transport hunting rifles or shotguns but they would need to be unloaded and in plain sight. If you used a used a handgun for hunting purposes, you would need a license to carry one concealed.

How to Obtain a Concealed Handgun License in North Dakota

To obtain a concealed handgun license, you must apply at the sheriff’s office in the county where you live and (if your city has one) the chief of police. To qualify, you must:

– Be at least 21 years old

– Be eligible to possess a firearm under state and federal law

– Have a valid reason for carrying a concealed firearm (including self protection, protection of others, or work-related needs)

– Submit a license fee

– Pass a background check, and

– Pass a test administered by a certified firearm and dangerous weapons instructor.

Does North Dakota Recognize Concealed Carry Gun Permits From Other States?

A valid concealed handgun permit or license issued by another state is valid in North Dakota as long as the other state recognizes concealed handgun permits from North Dakota within that other state.

People Who May Not Carry a Gun in North Dakota

The following individuals are prohibited from carrying a weapon (open or concealed) in North Dakota.

– People younger than 21 years old

– People ineligible to possess a firearm under federal law

– People convicted of certain violent crimes; a felony; or offenses involving alcohol, illegal drugs, crimes of moral turpitude, or domestic violence.

– People adjudicated as mentally incompetent, confined or committed to a hospital or institution, and who have suffered from this mental disability at some point within the last three years (unless adjudication has been withdrawn or reversed)

– Situations or Circumstances Where Carrying a Gun is Illegal

– The following rules govern when you may not carry a gun in North Dakota. They do not apply to law enforcement officers, active duty members of the armed services, people participating in organized shooting events or gun shows, and municipal and district court judges.

– You may not carry a concealed or loaded firearm on or near your body or vehicle without a concealed carry permit. In addition to the exceptions listed above, this does not apply to a person engaged in lawful hunting or trapping.

– You may not carry a weapon at a public gathering (such as, but not limited to, sporting events, public parks, in churches, or at political rallies).

– You may not carry a weapon into gaming establishments or establishments where alcoholic beverages are sold. This does not apply to owners of such an establishment, when in their own establishment; or an employee, or private security personnel delivering or receiving money.

For more information about carrying a concealed weapon or what states have reciprocity with North Dakota you can go to the Attorney General’s website at: ag.nd.gov/BCI/CW/CW.htm

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