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Rugby Housing: A multi-part study (part four)

March 30, 2018
Pierce County Tribune

Note: The following Part 4, is a continuation of the review of the Comprehensive Housing Survey started in the Tribune in March. The Rugby mobile housing, and stand alone housing Condition, is a part of the housing trends that have been produced for the Job Development Board from ESRI, a private data reporting service through Community Partners Research.

As part of the Rugby Housing Study, Community Partners Research, Inc. conducted a visual 'windshield' survey of 446 single family/duplex houses in three of Rugby's oldest neighborhoods. Houses that appeared to have three or more units were excluded from the study.

Boundaries of the three neighborhoods are:

Article Photos

- Neighborhood No. 1 North City limits, S 1st St E., West 4th Ave.NW, and East-Western Ave

- Neighborhood No. 2 North of RR tracks, South-6th St. SE, West S. Main Ave, and East-7th Ave SE

- Neighborhood No. 3 - North-2nd St. SW, South-6th St. SW, Wet-4th Ave. SW and East-S Main Ave.

Houses were rated in one of four levels of physical condition at the time of the survey. This does not account for many roofs that were completed in 2017 due to a hail storm that damaged many the summer of 2016. Exterior condition is assumed to be a reasonable indicator of the structure's interior

In 2011, the existing house stock in the three neighborhoods was in fair to good condition. Twelve homes were rated as dilapidated and possibly beyond repair. Three homes were suitable for demolition.

Rugby Mobile Home Conditions

In the Housing Study, a visual 'windshield' survey was conducted of the mobile homes in Rugby's two mobile home parks Parkland Court and Eastside Estates. Mobile home parks are rated in one of four levels of physical condition. This survey only analyzed physical visible exterior of each structure.

As in regular houses, the exterior is assumed to be a reasonable indicator of the structure's interior condition. Dilapidated units are considered beyond repair. Major Repair units need multiple major improvements such as roof, windows, and siding. Units in this condition may or not be feasible to rehabilitate. Minor Repairs are considered to be generally in good condition. Units in this category are generally economically feasible to repair.

 
 

 

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