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Summer Grilling and Food Safety

July 31, 2015
Carolee Kaylor - Nutrition Program Assistant , Pierce County Tribune

Summer not only brings out barbecue grills, but also bacteria. Bacteria love the hot, humid days of summer; they grow faster than at any other time of the year and can cause foodborne illness. Summer barbecues are a great way to enjoy the outdoors and each other's company. Keep your barbecues with family and friends healthy and safe this summer with the following tips.

Barbecue Basics and Food Safety:

Keep it clean - Wash hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling food. If you're eating where there's no source of clean water, bring water, soap, and paper towels or have disposable wipes or hand sanitizer available.

Marinate food in the refrigerator - Don't marinate on the counter, marinate in the refrigerator. If you want to use marinade as a sauce on cooked food, save a separate portion in the refrigerator. Do not reuse marinade that contacted raw meat, poultry, or seafood on cooked food unless you bring it to a boil first.

Keep raw food separate - Keep your barbecue safe by keeping raw meat, poultry, and seafood in a separate cooler or securely wrapped at the bottom of a cooler. Don't use a plate or utensils that previously held raw meat, poultry, or seafood for anything else unless you wash them first in hot, soapy water. Have a clean platter and utensils ready at grill-side for serving.

Seeing isn't believing - Many assume that if a hamburger is brown in the middle, it's done. Looking only at the color and texture of food is not enough -you have to use a food thermometer to be sure. According to USDA research, 1 out of every 4 hamburgers turns brown before it reaches a safe internal temperature. The only safe way to know if meat, poultry, and egg dishes are "done" is to use a food thermometer. When a hamburger is cooked to 160 degrees Fahrenheit as measured with a food thermometer, it is both safe and delicious!

Keep hot food hot, and cold food cold - Keep hot food at 140F or above until served. Keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill, or wrapped well in an insulated container. Keep cold food at 40F or below until served. Keep cold perishable food in a cooler until serving time, out of direct sun, and avoid opening the lid often.

Temperature and time - Keep your barbecues with family and friends safe this summer by remembering that the time perishable food can be left outside the refrigerator or freezer drops from two hours to one hour in temperatures above 90F. For your next barbecue, have a food thermometer, several coolers, ice or frozen gel packs, water, soap and paper towels, enough plates and utensils to keep raw and cooked foods separate, and foil or other wrap for leftovers.

By Lisa Franzen-Castle, PhD, RD Extension Nutrition Specialist

University of Nebraska Lincoln Extension

GRILLED CHICKEN AND HERBS

4 large skinless, boneless chicken breast halves

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon dried rosemary

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon chopped garlic

teaspoon salt

teaspoon ground black pepper

Preheat grill for medium heat and lightly oil the grate. Rinse chicken breasts, pat dry with paper towels, and pierce several times with a fork. Place chicken breast into a large resealable plastic bag and pour in olive oil. Seal and shake bag to coat chicken with olive oil; add rosemary, thyme, oregano, garlic, salt, and black pepper to the bag, seal, and shake again to coat chicken with herbs. Grill chicken breasts on the preheated grill until the juices run clear and an instant-read meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reads at least 160 degrees F (70 degrees C) about 10 minutes per side.

From Allrecipes.com

 
 

 

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