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Kaylor: How much do you know about eggs?

April 10, 2014
Carolee Kaylor - Nutrition Program Assistant , Pierce County Tribune

Try this quiz.

1. True or false: Eggs with white shells and brown shells have the same nutritional value.

2. Eggs are a good source of high-quality _______, which your body needs to maintain muscle.

3. After cooking, what should the internal temperature of "mixed egg dishes" (such as egg casseroles) be? _____ degrees F.

4. Egg yolks are a source of this "sunshine vitamin": Vitamin ____.

5. True or false: Healthy people usually can eat one egg a day without affecting their blood cholesterol level.

The answers:

1. True. The color of the eggshells depends on the breed of the chicken.

2. The protein in eggs is of high quality and contains all the essential amino acids (protein building blocks).

3. Cook egg-containing casseroles to 160 degrees F. Use a food thermometer to check doneness.

4. Vitamin D is naturally present in egg yolks. Vitamin D works with calcium to maintain

strong bones, and it has several other jobs in our body.

5. True, but check with your doctor or dietitian if you are on a special diet for a health

condition.

Incredible Eggs

Eggs are "egg-ceptional" additions to our diet, whether we scramble, hard-cook or poach them. They have about 70 calories and 13 vitamins and minerals.

We need to handle eggs safely in our kitchen because some eggs contain salmonella, a type of bacteria. Be sure to cook and store eggs properly.

Here's how to keep eggs safe:

Open the carton and check eggs at the grocery store. Be sure you don't buy cracked eggs.

Store eggs in their carton in the main part of your refrigerator, not in the door. With proper refrigeration, raw eggs in their shells remain high in quality for about three weeks after you purchase them.

Cook eggs until the yolks and whites are firm. Be sure scrambled eggs are not runny.

Use refrigerated hard-cooked eggs within one week. Use refrigerated leftover egg casseroles within four days.

From NDSU Extension Service Julie Garden-Robinson, Food & Nutrition Specialist

DEVILED EGGS

6 large hard-cooked and peeled eggs

c. mayonnaise (made with canola or olive oil, if available)

1/8 tsp. salt

1/8 tsp. pepper

Paprika (optional, for garnish)

"Hard cook" eggs, then cool and peel. Slice eggs into halves lengthwise. Place yolks in a

1-quart zip-type bag along with mayonnaise, salt and pepper. Close bag and mix by squeezing the bag until all ingredients are thoroughly mixed and resemble paste. Alternately, you can mix in a bowl with a fork or mixer. Push contents toward one corner of the bag. Cut about inch off the corner of the bag. Squeeze the bag gently and fill the cooked egg white halves with the yolk mixture. Sprinkle lightly with paprika if desired. Chill to blend flavors.

Makes six servings. A serving (two egg halves) has 140 calories, 12 grams (g) of fat, 0 g carbohydrate, 6 g protein and 170 milligrams of sodium.

INDIVIDUAL BAKED EGGS

1 slice bacon

1 teaspoon melted butter

1 egg

slice Cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Place bacon in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium high heat until evenly brown, but still flexible. Wrap bacon slice around the inside of a muffin cup. Place a teaspoon of butter (or bacon grease) in the bottom of muffin cup. Drop in egg. Bake in preheated oven for 10 to 15 minutes. Place slice of cheese over egg, and continue cooking until cheese is melted and egg is cooked.

 
 

 

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